Archive for the ‘international trade’ Category

About those corporate tax rates…

credit: Mike Licht (CC BY 2.0)

We hear that corporate tax rates, at 35% (federal), are too high and need to be reduced so U S companies can be competitive.  I remain confident that the best way to fund public services is thru a tax on land value and other measures of privilege, but if any kind of corporate tax is to be retained, here are a few things to consider:

  • The statutory rate is 35%, but there are all kinds of credits and deductions a corporation can take, so typically the effective rate is much less. Here’s a U S Treasury report (pdf)  claiming that effective corporate tax rates were 20% in 2011, the most recent year calculated. Major corporations have the ability to obtain special tax favors. (Just scan thru the tax code (big pdf) to find some of these special favors, available only to individual projects or corporations which reached specific milestones on specific combinations of dates.)
  • Enterprises in most countries, but not in the United States, have to pay a national value-added or sales tax.  The rate and details of course varies by country, but is typically about 19% as indicated by this OECD spreadsheet.  Scroll down to the second half of this article to get some more perspective from John Hussman.
  • Most U S states impose an additional corporate income tax, with varying rates and rules. Illinois takes 9.5%.    I have no knowledge about other states nor subnational jurisdications outside the US.  However, this table from Deloitte (pdf) provides some detail, including an assertion that the total national+local corporate tax rate in Germany is about 30-33%.
  • Some commentators complain about “double taxation” of corporate earnings, because corporate dividends are paid out of after-tax earnings.  However, incorporation, with its perpetual life and limitation of liability, is a privilege, for which it’s reasonable to expect corporations to pay.  I don’t suppose that taxable income is the best measure of the value of this privilege, perhaps a small percentage of total expenditures would be better, but certainly the appropriate fee is greater than zero. Furthermore, a considerable percentage of corporate stock is owned by various kinds of entities which do not pay tax, such as universities and other nonprofits, and Roth IRA’s.

More propaganda I am too slothful to review

Graffito image by Horia Varlan (cc) via flickr

Graffito image by Horia Varlan (cc) via flickr

A new report “Copyright Industries in the U S Economy” has been released by the IIPA (A conspiracy of seven associations of copyprivilege holders).  I should read and review it, but I could not do a better job than Mike Masnick, so read his review and the comments thereon.  Of course, IIPA and its members probably have several staff and/or automatons, whose duties include responding to constructive comments. Fortunately, they get responded to in turn.

Like the man said

“In order to preserve and enhance jobs, exports and economic contributions, it is critical that we have strong legal protections for U.S. creativity and innovation in the U.S. and abroad.”

Which means creators need to be free to create, with strong legal protection against those who would try to prevent their use of ideas which may have been touched by others.

The other downside of export subsidies

Boeing and Airbus products photo by contri via flickr (cc)

Boeing and Airbus products photo by contri via flickr (cc)

Entrenched U S carrier Delta Airlines complains that their foreign competitors can buy Boeing jets cheaper than Delta can. Why? Because the federal Export-Import Bank offers loan guarantees, intended to make Boeing’s products more cost-competitive in the international marketplace, particularly against Airbus.

Of course this is a case where we might be better off allowing the “free market,” whatever that is, to set the cost of financing.  Abolish the ex-im bank, let manufacturers offer subsidized financing from their own resources if they wish, and don’t worry about the “balance” of trade.  But Boeing has sufficient political power that is unlikely.  Perhaps some favors will be offered to Delta, who doubtless also has political friends, in order to get them to drop the suit or minimize its practical impact.

As some indicator of the likely outcome, Influence Explorer says that Delta spent $4,154,382 on lobbying during the most recent reporting period, whereas Boeing spent $24,120,000.